Revisiting: The Crown of Embers

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Goodreads Summary:

She does not know what awaits her at the enemy’s gate.

Elisa is a hero.

She led her people to victory over a terrifying, sorcerous army. Her place as the country’s ruler should be secure. But it isn’t.

Her enemies come at her like ghosts in a dream, from foreign realms and even from within her own court. And her destiny as the chosen one has not yet been fulfilled.

To conquer the power she bears, once and for all, Elisa must follow a trial of long-forgotten—and forbidden—clues, from the deep, hidden catacombs of her own city to the treacherous seas. With her go a one-eyed spy, a traitor, and the man whom—despite everything—she is falling in love with.

If she’s lucky, she will return from this journey. But there will be a cost.

I really enjoyed the first book in this series, much more than I had expected, and this book was simply amazing. We all know I am fan of the squeal, and this book is exactly why.

Elisa goes through a ton of growth in the first book, but this one just keeps pushing her. She’s faced with so many tough decisions, as well as personal issues. She’s being forced to choose her country over herself and it’s taking a tole on her self-esteem. She’s facing push-back from her court, she’s still learning about her Godstone and its meaning, and ultimately she’s growing up. By the end of this book she is truly a woman, no longer giving into old friends or advisers, and learning to trust herself more than she ever has.

While the majority of this book takes place in her palace, the political elements are so action filled that there is never a dull moment. On top of that, we see Elisa developing deeper and more trusting relationships with those around her. She and Mara are beginning to bond, she is learning that she can make decisions without consulting her faithful nurse, and the members of her court like little Rosario, Tristan, and her old cohorts from the East highlight facets of her new growth and ownership of her role as the bearer and queen.

Ultimately though, I think the relationship we all love most is the one that develops between she and Hector. I loved Hector from the start, but watching them work together, seeing them develop deeper emotions for one another, and the strength they imbue in each other is amazing. It’s one of those book romances that you can’t help but get swoony over. I can’t wait to see how they navigate their tenuous relationship in the final installment.

Beyond the amazing relationships that develop in this, there are also some new characters that I really like and can’t wait to see more of. The continuing discoveries about the Godstone are also really interesting and I don’t even know what to expect with that anymore. What I am most excited for though is how Elisa takes her new idea of forming her own destiny – not letting it be formed by those around her and old pieces of parchment – and executes that in this last book. This is definitely one of my new favorite series.

On my second read I had forgotten how quickly Elisa started to resent her nurse Ximena, especially when she begins to meddle in Elisa’s life. Elisa has truly come into her own, but her uncertainty of the new role has her being rash and mercurial – but that’s her growth in this one. She learns how to balance council from others with her personal beliefs and need to appear strong.

The swoon hit me hard again in this, I love the slow burn of Elisa and Hector, and how they trust and respect each other with her decisions and role as queen. As she gains confidence in her role to make decisions, his support is something that I think exacerbates Ximena’s transition from protector and confidant to inhibitor. Elisa outgrows her need for that relationship. I also loved getting old characters from the desert back in this one still, and their friendships help her find a comfort zone in her new role. As well as the new role of Tristain, who becomes a fast favorite, and adds a nice element of diversity to this series.

 

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