Review: A Court of Wings and Ruin

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Goodreads Summry:

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit-and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords-and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

In this thrilling third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling series from Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all.

I think I need to start with this: I still have no idea how books are classified as YA, because this should definitely not be in that grouping. My friend works at a middle school library and they have these books for the 8th graders, and I personally would not let my daughter read this until late high school at least. There are some very explicit sex scenes in these books, and some extremely brutal fight/torture scenes. I may be living in a bubble, but I would like to think kids don’t know about those kinds of things in such detail in middle school. . .

This picks up right where the second one leaves off and I really enjoy the scheming, and appreciate the fact that there are times when the Tamlin we first met shines through and Feyre notes those as well. With the history all of these characters share I was very glad it wasn’t all petty hatred for each other.

Lucien was one of my favorites from the beginning and I like seeing him in a larger role again. He’s a good guy and deserves a good ending.  He reminds me a lot of Chaol and how they have dueling needs within them for what’s right and what they believe they are bound to do. But I think Lucien is already on the way to wanting to take what’s right over commands. I like how quickly Lucien acclimates to the night court, and I think a lot of that is the fact that his council is appreciated. I also liked seeing him take initiative within the court and create an active role for himself. The tentative interest Elaine he’s showing is sweet and I hope he gets his girl, he deserves it.

It’s really nice seeing Feyre finally finding her place in the night court and falling into it, especially with the arrival of her sisters and the new skills they have. Amren and Nesta and Elaine and Azriel training together are such good matches too, their similar personalities allowing them to integrate into Feyre’s new family as well as coax them out of their shells and into their new powers and the court as a whole. Cassian and Nesta’s odd relationship was also very interesting to watch as it unveils sides of each character we never really saw before, given how they hide themselves behind facades the majority of the time.

The power plays within and without the court are getting very serious, and we are seeing how all of them are having to chose between various bad choices to try and save the country and themselves. It was really fun getting some more background on Amren, and watching her with Varian was hilarious.  It was nice to see Tamlin move beyond his jealousy and accept some responsibility for how things turned out. And even the tertiary characters get a lot more attention in this, giving us more background on Jurian and some of the other characters from the first war.

This book brings everything full circle. Most of the unanswered questions as answered (apparently we have three more books coming out in this series, so we should get all the answers at some point) and Feyre and her family (human and night court) reach new potentials and grown into themselves. There was a lot of great battle scenes in this, and I quite enjoyed seeing the night court operating at full family mode – there were no more secrets (mostly) and they were all supporting each other and revealing more about themselves.

I look forward to seeing what else comes out of this world.

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Revisiting: A Court of Mist and Fury

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

With more than a million copies sold of her beloved Throne of Glass series, Sarah J. Maas’s masterful storytelling brings this second book in her seductive and action-packed series to new heights.

After my reassessment of the first book in this series, and my utter disappointment at the last book in the TOG series, I didn’t know how this book was going to go.

Well, right of the bat, I was so much more enthralled by the story. I didn’t get bored or sidetracked, I was hooked basically immediately. Both Tamlin and Feyre are so broken from all that happened, and it was really interesting watching them try to navigate their feelings about themselves, each other, and the future. Unlike the horrendous character transformations that occurred in Queen of Shadows – that have me questioning if I will even finish that series, I have not by the way – I was so happy that the reactions from all these characters still felt true to their nature.

Tamlin is doing everything he can to keep the ones he loves safe, and making sure he is seen as the strength and leader he thinks he needs to be as a High Lord. Feyre is trying to figure out who she is after the traumatic events that happened to her, and that she exacted on others. She’s having to decide if the strength she found in herself Under the Mountain is who she wants to become. While these two navigate their issues, they don’t necessarily do it well together, but I never felt like one of them was purposefully trying to hurt the other; they just didn’t quite know how to be together without reliving all the horrors they had been through for each other. Rhysand was a very interesting character from the beginning, and he’s also going through a lot of post-traumatic issues from his time with Amarantha. Watching these three deal with their issues in very different ways was so interesting and well done.

Beyond the tumultuous relationships, we get a slew of new characters. Let me just say, I hated Ianthe from the very beginning,but I really hope to see more of her in the next book. The inner circle of the night court – Azriel, Cassian, Mor, and Amren – is so well done. Each character has very specific traits and character aspects, but together they create such a strong and supportive family.

The political aspect of this book is so much deeper than in the first and I really liked seeing the different players. Tamlin and his court are still the most unknown to me, but we get a look at the Summer court, the human queens, and even the King of Hybern. All of these players have very different priorities, and it’s so intriguing to watch as their personal wants influence the greater aspect of the coming war.

The book ends on a bit of a cliff hanger, and I can’t wait to see how it all plays out in the next book! Maas has redeemed herself to me a bit, hopefully she can keep it up!

Revisiting: A Court of Thorns and Roses

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Goodreads Summary:

A thrilling, seductive new series from New York Timesbestselling author Sarah J. Maas, blending Beauty and the Beast with faerie lore.

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a beast-like creature arrives to demand retribution for it. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she only knows about from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not an animal, but Tamlin—one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled their world.

As she dwells on his estate, her feelings for Tamlin transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie and warning she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But an ancient, wicked shadow grows over the faerie lands, and Feyre must find a way to stop it . . . or doom Tamlin—and his world—forever.

I was so excited about this book, I fell in love with Maas’ writing with the Throne of Glass series and so I could not wait for this. And then I started seeing reviews of my goodreads friends, who seemed to either hate it or love it, and I was terrified. Well, I loved it . . . the first time around.

I still liked it in my re-read, but it was so much slower than I remembered. I wasn’t really invested until about the 200 page mark, and nothing really intense starts to happen until about the 300 page mark. Also, the romance didn’t reel me in like it did the first time around, I just don’t really buy it’s depth, it was almost a case of insta-love with its shallowness. I mean Feyre doesn’t really know Tamlin at all, and besides the fact that he does nice things for her and is hot, I don’t know why she ‘loves,’ him. And his lack of reaction when she’s facing her trials really annoys me. I feel like Maas doesn’t want us to like Tamlin already, which is really annoying given our past experiences with romance in Mass books, and that the majority of this book is centered around a relationship.

I loved how Maas’ carried over a lot of the things we learned about Fae in ToG, consistency is a favorite trait of mine! I also really liked this loose retelling of Beauty and the Beast. That’s what seemed to be what a lot of people had issues with. Not long after finishing this the first time I learned that it’s actually based on the myth of Eros and Psyche, which is what the Grimm story is based on. I don’t understand why they didn’t market it as the Eros/Psyche story since they did the Hades/Persephone for the sequel, but whatever. Anyway, if you know the myth of Eros/Psyche I think it makes the story so much better, because so many of the nuances that irritated people who were expecting Beauty and the Beast are present in the original myth and make more sense.

Other’s had issues with the basic format of Maas books, which I can understand, but I think if you’ve read ToG you will be prepared for it. The first book of her series seems to be the – get to know everyone, introduction to the conflict, scraping the top of the iceberg on what’s really going on,  and the following books are when everything gets crazy.

I really enjoyed getting to know Feyre and watching her steady character growth. She goes from someone simply surviving, a cold, hard, bitter, and pessimistic person to someone who is able to find a silver lining in everything, who opens up and pushes herself to move past her preconceived notions,  and who embraces her strengths and weaknesses to fight for the things she loves.

I also loved all the other characters, because Maas does a great job with supporting roles and weaving them into the story later. Lucien is great with his snark and tragic backstory. Tamlin suffers from a lot of the same issues Feyre is dealing with, feeling alone/trapped in their responsibilities to their families/people, but ultimately wanting to do the right thing, but we get moments where we can see that’s he fun and caring. Rhys is so intriguing! I feel like he and Feyre are going to be the Celeana/Rowan of ACoTaR, the besties who prove guys and girls can be friends w/o and ulterior motive, and he is clearly a much nicer guy than he likes to admit.

With the last ToG book, I think we all know platonic relationships are not always what they seem with Maas. And while I was so upset (and still am) with how things turned out in the last ToG book. From what I have seen about ACOMAF, she does a much better job with the romance. Though I have to say, I am getting really tired of her female characters not being able to stay true to a relationship. I understand things happen, but seriously Celeana – or whatever your name is now – get it together. I really hope Feyre doesn’t become as fickle as our ToG protagonist.

The ending’s twist was the other thing that I kind of expected, and wanted to happen, but was still slightly displeased about, I guess it just felt too convenient. We’ll see what’s to come in this second one though, it seems like things really get taken up a few notches, which I am excited about!

Coming This Week: May 16

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This weekend was crazy! We drove to Kentucky for a friends wedding, stopped overnight in St. Louis, and got to see a ton of college friends we haven’t seen in forever. It was so much fun, though a lot of car time.

Well, hopefully you guys had fun weekends, and/or read something good. For this week look for book discussions on:

Both of these series were in my top rated last year when I started them. Well, re-reading ACOTAR had me less impressed with the start of the latest Maas series, so we’ll see how I go into ACOMAF feeling.

June 365DaysofYA Challenge Book List

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We are half way through the year and the challenge, I can’t believe that! Anyway, there isn’t a link up for this month up yet, but I do like my schedules and patterns so I’m going to put up my list for this month anyway. I have a lot. . .

Update! The link is up now!

You can still join the 365DaysofYA Challenge over at Sarah’s blog I am really enjoying it. A lot of the books I had planned to read are on it, but it’s also introduced me to a few contemporaries – a genre I don’t usually go for – that I have really enjoyed. So check it out!