Review: Hidden Huntress

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Sometimes, one must accomplish the impossible.

Beneath the mountain, the king’s reign of tyranny is absolute; the one troll with the capacity to challenge him is imprisoned for treason. Cécile has escaped the darkness of Trollus, but she learns all too quickly that she is not beyond the reach of the king’s power. Or his manipulation.

Recovered from her injuries, she now lives with her mother in Trianon and graces the opera stage every night. But by day she searches for the witch who has eluded the trolls for five hundred years. Whether she succeeds or fails, the costs to those she cares about will be high.

To find Anushka, she must delve into magic that is both dark and deadly. But the witch is a clever creature. And Cécile might not just be the hunter. She might also be the hunted…

This started a bit rough. I had guessed in the first book what the trolls really are, but the liberal use of the term is a bit anticlimactic after all the secrecy in the first book. And the relationship between Cecile and Tristan is obviously going to be a rough ride in this second installment.  The intrigue behind the troll king and his motives is still a solid plot point though, and one of the aspects I enjoyed so much about the first book.

The main plot point of this book though is the mystery of who Anushka is, and that’s something I had guessed at in the first book. So the fact that the majority of this novel is spent trying to uncover this mystery, while I have known the answer even before this book started – a little bit due to the inevitability of it based on every other fantasy book – left me annoyed with the characters for the most part in their utter stupidity to not see what I thought was so obvious.

A lot of what I enjoy about second books is the expanded character development. While both Cecile and Tristan are gong though identity crises and dealing with the repercussions of their actions, I didn’t feel like there was much expansion with Cecile. Tristan however did show some improvement with his determination to trust beyond himself, and I appreciated that.

I felt like this second book ultimately wasn’t too necessary. Beyond the first third when the two are separated we get into a mystery that is glaringly obvious to everyone but our protagonists. And Cecile’s impulsiveness is moving beyond her ignorance of the first book into something more along the lines of idiocy. I really hope to see a better balance of her need for instant action with Tristan’s logic in the final book.

Review: Stolen Songbird

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Goodreads Synopsis:

For five centuries, a witch’s curse has bound the trolls to their city beneath the mountain. When Cécile de Troyes is kidnapped and taken beneath the mountain, she realises that the trolls are relying on her to break the curse.

Cécile has only one thing on her mind: escape. But the trolls are clever, fast, and inhumanly strong. She will have to bide her time…

But the more time she spends with the trolls, the more she understands their plight. There is a rebellion brewing. And she just might be the one the trolls were looking for…

I don’t think this is categorized as a fairy tale retelling or anything but it has a strong Beauty and the Beast vibe, and I immensely enjoyed that aspect of this.

I liked the characters. The situation for Cecile’s arrival is traumatic, but I appreciate how she accepts that her best bet for survival is to wait for an opportunity, and to learn about her captors. Tristan is much more emotional and complex then his facade would leave one to believe, and I enjoyed seeing the layers revealed. The twins were a great spot of light in a very dark and twisted political and social setting. And as we discover the depths of the curse, and the additional factors of rebellion and harsh social classes this book becomes much more then a star-crossed lovers story.
When it comes to Tristan and Cecile though it’s hard for me to really note when they begin to forge a romantic relationship. They spend very little time together, though you do see a slow build of trust. I also enjoyed how they challenge each other, and the vulnerability they have in front of each other, it’s realistic. It’s also interesting how through their bond and understanding of the other they begin to take on some of each other’s traits. Tristan becomes more impulsive and in a way, selfish, wanting something that makes him personally happy. And Cecile starts to become selfless, wanting to help people she has no responsibility to help, and trying to be more strategic in her actions. However, I still didn’t see when their relationship became love.

I look forward to seeing how this series continues, and how solutions are found for the increased troubles we’ve developed in this first installment.