Review: Daughter of the Pirate King

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33643994.jpgGoodreads Synopsis:

There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.

Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.

More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.

I went into this book expecting a lot of fun and adventure. It didn’t necessarily lack either of those, but for the majority of this book I felt that there was something lacking. I think that something was the main character . . . but there is potential still for her and the author as they work towards the companion novel.
You can tell this is a debut. It’s comes off as if it’s trying a little too hard from the start and does a lot more telling as opposed to showing. The telling is what irked me for the majority of this novel. Our main character tells us everything – I mean everything. There is nothing left for us to deduce on our own through actions, mannerisms, or expressions. And while we are getting an ongoing narration of the events by Alosa, we are also getting her very arrogant opinions. While I understand that with a first person narration we are going to have bias from the narrator, I felt it was too much at times and had to set the book down because of how irritated I was getting. Furthermore, the action felt very slapstick, with such a ‘badass’ I hoped for more than literal bashing of heads together to get out of every scenario.
This all does begin to improve after the charading dies down and we get more information about the reason why Alosa is on the ship and more about her relationship with her father. The dynamic of Alosa and Riden also gets more entertaining as they play off each other’s more intimate traits. And I’m glad that whiles there’s on ongoing flirtation, we don’t fall into instalove. There really isn’t any romance at all, which I appreciated. We have the flirtation, the attraction between the two that they use to get what they want from the other, but there is no indication of deeper feeling until the end, and even then neither one is really sure enough about those feelings or their trust in the other person to admit them. While I had a lot of issues with the book in general, this was one of the redeeming qualities for me.
As we got into the bigger secret reveals and deeper into the characters minds we also start to loose some of the immaturity of the beginning of the book. The revelation of Alosa’s “secret” didn’t surprise me at all, but I can see how it adds complexity to the story. And now that we know, hopefully as we move forward she will be less cryptic. I did enjoy the few moments we had with Alosa without her tricks and masks to hide behind. If the next novel deals with that girl I would be very interested, but I will have to see what the reviews are before I commit to signing back on with Alosa.